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Our expectations from FG at 61 — Nigeria — The Guardian Nigeria News – Nigeria and World News – Guardian

As Nigeria celebrates its 61st independence anniversary, a cross-section of pupils have called on the Federal Government to address some salient issues in the country to make it a better place. They spoke with GBENGA AKINFENWA.
Federal Government should tackle insecurity, fund the health sector
I want the Federal Government to address the lingering security challenges — Boko Haram, killer herdsmen, kidnappers and bandits threatening all the regions of the country.
The development has made it practically impossible for students to go to school in the Northeast, while some academic-related activities have been made difficult for them, to the extent that schools are in total lockdown in some parts of the country.
Also, the rate of out-of-school children in Nigeria is increasing at an alarming rate, which has been linked to the insurgency by militia groups.

Solomon Praise Ogunniyi, SS3<br />Unity High School, Ijoko Ota, Ogun State

Poverty has also prevented children from attending school as some parents find it difficult to provide the necessary materials needed for schooling.
Solomon Praise Ogunniyi, SS3<br />Unity High School, Ijoko Ota, Ogun State
Most of our hospitals and other health care facilities are not properly equipped with modern-day equipment to carry out tests and all forms of strategies for treating patients. The rate of doctors to patients is alarming. Currently, our medical doctors are on strike.
I want to appeal to the government at all levels to improve funding of the health sector, tackle insecurity and infrastructure in our schools.
Solomon Praise Ogunniyi, SS3
Unity High School, Ijoko Ota, Ogun State.

FG should address problems of the health sector
For decades, deplorable health facilities, fake drugs as well as poor funding have made access to good healthcare difficult in Nigeria. Hundreds die daily, as the government fails to address the challenges in the sector.
Insecurity has become a hydra-headed monster, which has made economic, social and political growth and development difficult for individuals and communities. No nation can develop adequately when there is a high level of insecurity.
Fathia Kemi Yinusa, SS3<br />Unity High School, Ijoko Ota, Ogun State.
The precarious level of insecurity is responsible for the rising number of out-of-school children, especially in the north.
We need the government to address the acute poverty in the land so that indigent parents can afford to send their wards to school. Government should also support girl-child education by ensuring equity in the system.
Fathia Kemi Yinusa, SS3
Unity High School, Ijoko Ota, Ogun State.

Spread of COVID-19 should be checked
AS I congratulate the Federal Government, states and citizens on the nation’s 61 independence anniversary, I want the government to ensure that people comply with the COVID-19 protocols, in order to protect vulnerable children.
The use of facemask, hand sanitisers and regular washing of hands should continue to be necessary requirements. Children’s departments in hospitals should be adequately equipped for greater efficiency and effectiveness as today’s healthy children will build tomorrow’s healthy Nigeria.
Baqeeyah Adeteru
Peace Foundation International College, Abeokuta, Ogun State.

Healthy habits should be taught in religious, educational organisations
We are happy that Nigeria is celebrating another Independence Day. The nationalists who fought for Nigeria’s independence were once children. They grew up to be healthy adults and good health contributed to their ability to fight for independence.
This is why the health of children should be a top priority. A healthy child will be a healthy student at school. The home is the first school of a child, parents should teach us ways of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Healthy habits should also be taught by religious and educational organisations.
Maria Adekunle
Peace Foundation International College, Abeokuta, Ogun State.

Laws should be enforced for school-age children to attend school
I have mixed feelings about this year’s independence celebration. On one hand, freedom is sweet; therefore, a celebration is necessary.
On the other hand, the many problems in the country will no doubt affect the mood of the citizenry. These problems do not leave out children. Apart from the persisting problem of insecurity, many children lack proper care because of the harsh economic situation.

Amdalah Oladeinde<br />Anglican Grammar School (Private), Okenla, Ifo, Ogun State.

We see many children on the streets begging for alms and food. Many of our mates do not attend school. Their talents are wasting away, laws have been made in the past to compel children of school age to attend school, unfortunately, the laws are not enforced.
Amdalah Oladeinde
Anglican Grammar School (Private), Okenla, Ifo, Ogun State.

Amdalah Oladeinde<br />Anglican Grammar School (Private), Okenla, Ifo, Ogun State.
Universal Basic Education policy should be fully enforced
My heart goes to children that are out of school at this time. Some are forced to engage in hawking on the streets at a time they should be in school. Some are being used as housemaids, taking other people’s children to school.
Government should see to it that every child has the right to education. The Universal Basic Education policy of the government should be fully enforced to make sure that no child is deprived of learning.
Fikayomi Okuboye
Greenlands Academy, Abeokuta, Ogun State.

FG should stem the tide of bad governance
OBVIOUSLY, most Nigerians are not happy to celebrate this year’s independence anniversary due to the deplorable state of the nation.
It is now a tradition for the Nigerian police to brutalise youths at the slightest provocation. But at the very centre of these protests are frustrated youths, whose dreams are on hold and whose future is uncertain.
They are youths who are genuinely interested in good governance but are disappointed at the lack of it. But what really went wrong? Under the watch of President Muhammadu Buhari, Nigeria has gone from being a failed state to a dead one.
Virtually everything that shouldn’t go wrong has gone wrong. We believe that Africa is poorly represented and badly under-estimated beyond the vast opportunities available in the country. We highlight people who make a difference. Leader turning the tide, youth driving change, and an indefatigable business community, that is what we believe will change the continent, and that is what we rest on.
Johnson Nwaokoro
Livingstone College, Ikorodu, Lagos State.

Insecurity should be declared an emergency
The expectation of Nigerians when President Muhammadu Buhari was elected in 2015 was huge. He promised to protect citizens from terrorists and criminals, but less than two years into his tenure, insecurity and unrest reigned supreme, more than it has been in decades.
From education to security and economic sectors, it has been tales of woe. Nigeria is faced with an unprecedented wave of different but overlapping security crises from kidnapping to extremist insurgencies. Almost every corner of the country has been hit by violence and crime.
With every attack, human lives are lost or permanently damaged and faith in democracy is diminishing. One of the scariest threats for families in Nigeria is the frequent kidnapping of school children from their classrooms and hostels, especially in the northern side of the country.
Iyanuoluwa Mabel Soyege
Livingstone College, Ikorodu, Lagos

Government should ensure bad governance is stopped
OBVIOUSLY, most Nigerians are not happily celebrating this year’s independence anniversary due to the economic situation.
It is now a tradition for the Nigerian police to brutalise youths at the slightest provocation. But at the very centre of these protests are frustrated youths, whose dreams are on hold and whose futures are uncertain.
They are youths who are genuinely interested in good governance but are disappointed at the lack of it. But what really went wrong? Under the watch of President Buhari, Nigeria has gone from being a failed state to a dead one.

Victor Okpala<br />Livingstone College, Ikorodu, Lagos State.

Virtually everything that shouldn’t go wrong has gone wrong. We believe that Africa is poorly represented and badly under-estimated beyond the vast opportunity manifest in the African market, we highlight people who make a difference. Leader turning the tide, youth driving change, and an indefatigable business community, that is what we believe will change the continent, and that is what we report on.
Victor Okpala
Livingstone College, Ikorodu, Lagos State.

Victor Okpala<br />Livingstone College, Ikorodu, Lagos State.
Government should address rate of unemployment
Insecurity has been a lingering challenge facing this country. No one is safe as there is no hiding place anymore. Everyone in the country is living in fear because of insecurity.
People have been murdered in cold blood; rape, ritual killings and other vices are on the increase on daily basis.
The health sector is not faring better. Government hospitals are in a pitiable state as equipment and other facilities are obsolete. Many people have died due to lack of access to a good health care system; we need more functional hospitals to take care of the masses, especially the poor.
Another problem that needs to be addressed by the government is the high rate of unemployment. Graduates are unemployable due to a lack of jobs and they spend years roaming the streets.
Shallom Gabriel
Sito God’s Time Schools, Abule-Egba, Lagos State.

Government should create more space for youths
Nigeria is confronted with many problems that have made it underdeveloped, among its peers. From unemployment, crime, corruption, poor state of the economy to academic decadence, Nigeria has slipped in recent times.
Corruption is the mother of all crimes in the country. This is more prevalent in government parastatals and corporate organisations.
Currently, households are finding it difficult to make ends meet. For instance, Nigeria is not exporting anything, but we depend on importation to survive. Our natural resources are not well utilised, coupled with the problem of uneven distribution of wealth.
I want the government to empower youths and invest in its citizens by securing lives and property.
Corruption must be reduced to the barest minimum if it cannot be eradicated, by ensuring that whoever steals money, takes or gives bribes is sanctioned.
Darasimi Olawole
Sito God’s Time Schools, Abule-Egba, Lagos State.

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